Kinesio Taping

Kinesio Tape is an elastic therapeutic tape that is a cotton strip with an acrylic adhesive that is used for treating athletic injuries and a variety of physical disorders. It was invented by Dr. Kenzo Kase, a Japanese chiropractor, in the 1970s.

During the second decade after its introduction the tape was adopted by Japanese Olympic and professional athletes. Today Kinesio tapes are used by medical practitioners and athletes in Japan, the United States, Europe, South America, Australia, Asia.

The tape is used in therapy to relax overused muscles and in rehabilitation to facilitate underused muscles. Advocates claim that the wave pattern found on the tape’s adhesive has a lifting effect on the skin which can reduce swelling and inflammation by improving circulation and reduce pain by taking pressure off pain receptors.

The popularity of elastic therapeutic tape in the United States surged after 50,000 rolls were donated and the tape was seen on Olympic athletes in the 2008 Beijing Summer Games. Of these athletes, the most notable was Kerri Walsh who used the tape in competition following surgery on her rotator cuff. Lance Armstrong, 7 time winner of the Tour de France, talks about using tape in his book, where he describes the effectiveness of the treatment for his sore muscles. Serena Williams has also used therapeutic tapes during competition. University of Connecticut basketball player Hasheem Thabeet wore black therapeutic tape on his left shoulder during the 2009 Men’s NCAA basketball tournament.

Kinesio Tape is not just for athletes but anyone from infants to 9-5ers.